Resistance

 Posted by on October 5, 2012  Add comments
Oct 052012
 
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You might have noticed over the past few posts that I like B+W toned prints.

I always have. I still have a handful of darkroom prints which I made when I was in the 7th form at school (year 13 for those who only understand the new system). Several of them are toned.

I remember having to go to the one and only chemist in Christchurch who sold whatever the particular concoction was so that I could make a solution to produce a dark blue toned print. I have no idea what it was but I remember having to sign some form or other. Presumably that was to make sure I wasn't going to drink the stuff.

So what is the attraction?

I have always liked B+W because it is not a literal view of the world. The audience can more easily say “look what he felt” rather than “look what he saw”.

Toning adds a layer to that. A earthy brown, deep cool blue or dark green with subtle yellow highlights puts more feeling into the image and takes things another step away from the literal.

 

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  5 Responses to “Resistance”

  1. B&W evokes a primal emotion within us, when do we see in B&W at night, when are we at the most vulnerable at night. That is one of the reasons that B&W effect’s us so much. It is the purest form of photography, well my opinion & several dozen well renowned master photographers.I could go on & on about it but I wont. The image has to be a good colour image first before it can be a great B&W. I will stop rambling now:)

  2. I think that because we live in a very complex reality we are always filtering it to make sense of it and pick what is relievent to us. B&W is great way to do that. Often the colour is confusing and much much more difercult to handle. By tinting an image you can introduce a colour emotion simply too.

  3. B&W is still a mix of colour, RGB has to be used to give the different tones of grey, there are 256 tones,of grey from 0 as pure black to 255 pure white.If you remove all the colour e.g desaturate you get the same tone of grey, a muddy image we often call it?

  4. I love reading these articles because they’re short but informative.

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