So Easy its Hard

 Posted by on July 16, 2012  Add comments
Jul 162012
 
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When I arrived in New Zealand in on August 3rd of 2003, I knew the landscape was enticing but I had no idea just how elusive it could be. By elusive, I mean difficult to translate what I am seeing in real life to an image which conveys the same sensations. This country has an unlimited supply of quiet corners, grand vistas, special days and hidden gems that would keep any team of photographers busy for a lifetime; nevermind a weekender who is still enslaved to a day job which prevents extensive exploration.

Case in point: Erewhon Station in winter. Everywhere I looked responded with an embracing view for the eyes and calming whisper for the soul. It was just nice to be engulfed in the expanse and senses of the place. Point a camera at it, and anyone can capture a shot that will make others want to visit. But to capture its essence in one frame like Colin Monteath, Matheson Beaumont or Andris Apse… years and years of craft. And therein lies the problem: it is so easy to achieve a basic competence because the landscape itself often covers the price of admission. I pretend I have made the grade until I see an image that truly has.

No matter, I still enjoyed being there and adding another +2 or +3 to my 10,000 hours of apprenticeship.

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  5 Responses to “So Easy its Hard”

  1. I experienced the same thing when we visited the mountains of Colorado. I stood at the base of them and ended up putting the camera away. I was completely overwhelmed with my inability to translate the feelings I held as I looked at them. I don’t think I will ever be able to photograph that sensation so I am happy to put that task aside for another lifetime or three, maybe.

  2. If only it was a 10,000 hour apprenticeship.But it is not. I have recently had a brain fart & come up with a list of 5 questions I ask myself before I press the shutter now, it seems to be working, well i think so:)

  3. Im glad you are enjoying the ride – Im certainly enjoying seeing your view point.

    For me thats the key – there is no way your “big 3” or anyone else can show us the “Dave Slaten” view of the world……

    Scott – so please tell us your list

  4. I could be mean & keep them to the people who sign up for my workshops but I like all you guys so here is #2 What are the part of the scene you need to capture? I will go in depth to each question when I run my workshops. #1 is in today’s post of Ian’s. I have spent alot of time studying about 6 different photographers to come up with these questions, alot of my Scottish brain cells have suffered an overload of information, but they all rallied together to give me this brain fart, it is as if the light has gone on, both in a Why do we & How we?

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